Last week, as I mentioned in my earlier post, I was in Frankfurt, Germany, for the ISC High Performance Computing conference. The thing that grabbed my attention, more than anything else, was the Student Cluster Competition.  11 teams from around the world - mostly from Universities - were competing to create the fastest (by a variety of measures) student supercomputer. These students have progressed from earlier regional competitions, and are the world's finest young HPC experts. Just being there was an amazing accomplishment. And these young people were obviously thrilled to be there.

Each team had hardware that had been sponsored by major HPC vendors. I talked with several of the teams about this. The UPC Thunderchip team, from Barcelona Tech, (Winner of the Fan Favorite award!) said that their hardware, for example, had been donated by (among other vendors) CoolIT systems, who had donated the liquid cooling system that sat atop their rack.

(When I was in college, we had a retired 3B2 that someone had dumpster-dived for us, but I'm not bitter.)

Over the course of the week, these teams were given a variety of data challenges. Some of them, they knew ahead of time and had optimized for. Others were surprise challenges, which they had to optimize for on the fly.

While the jobs were running, the students roamed the show floor, talking with vendors, and, I'm sure, making contacts that will be beneficial in their future careers.

Now, granted, I had a bit of a ulterior motive. I was trying to find out the role that CentOS plays in this space. And, as I mentioned in my earlier post, 8 of the 11 teams were running CentOS. (One - University of Hamburg - was running Fedora. Two - NorthEast/Purdue, and Barcelona Tech - were running Ubuntu) And teams that placed first, second, and third in the competition - (First place: Tsinghua University, Beijing. Second place: Centre for High Performance Computing South Africa. Third place: Beihang University, Beijing.) - were also running CentOS. And many of the research organizations I talked to were also running CentOS on their HPC clusters.

I ended up doing interviews with just two of the teams, about their hardware, and what tests that they had to complete on them to win the contest. You can see those on my YouTube channel, HERE and HERE.

At the end, while just three teams walked away with the trophies, all of these students had an amazing opportunity. I was so impressed with their professionalism, as well as their brilliance.

And good luck to the teams who have been invited to the upcoming competition in Denver. I hope I'll be able to observe that one, too!

An updated version of CentOS Atomic Host (tree version 7.1705), is now available. CentOS Atomic Host is a lean operating system designed to run Docker containers, built from standard CentOS 7 RPMs, and tracking the component versions included in Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host.

CentOS Atomic Host is available as a VirtualBox or libvirt-formatted Vagrant box, or as an installable ISO, qcow2 or Amazon Machine image. These images are available for download at cloud.centos.org. The backing ostree repo is published to mirror.centos.org.

CentOS Atomic Host includes these core component versions:

  • atomic-1.17.2-4.git2760e30.el7.x86_64
  • cloud-init-0.7.5-10.el7.centos.1.x86_64
  • docker-1.12.6-28.git1398f24.el7.centos.x86_64
  • etcd-3.1.7-1.el7.x86_64
  • flannel-0.7.0-1.el7.x86_64
  • kernel-3.10.0-514.21.1.el7.x86_64
  • kubernetes-node-1.5.2-0.6.gitd33fd89.el7.x86_64
  • ostree-2017.5-1.el7.x86_64
  • rpm-ostree-client-2017.5-1.atomic.el7.x86_64

Containerized kubernetes-master

The downstream release of CentOS Atomic Host ships without the kubernetes-master package built into the image. Instead, you can run the master kubernetes components (apiserver, scheduler, and controller-manager) in containers, managed via systemd, using the service files and instructions on the CentOS wiki. The containers referenced in these systemd service files are built in and hosted from the CentOS Community Container Pipeline, based on Dockerfiles from the CentOS-Dockerfiles repository.

These containers have been tested with the kubernetes ansible scripts provided in the upstream contrib repository, and they work as expected, provided you first copy the service files onto your master.

Alternatively, you can install the kubernetes-master components using rpm-ostree package layering using the command: atomic host install kubernetes-master.

Upgrading

If you're running a previous version of CentOS Atomic Host, you can upgrade to the current image by running the following command:

$ sudo atomic host upgrade

Images

Vagrant

CentOS-Atomic-Host-7-Vagrant-Libvirt.box and CentOS-Atomic-Host-7-Vagrant-Virtualbox.box are Vagrant boxes for Libvirt and Virtualbox providers.

The easiest way to consume these images is via the Atlas / Vagrant Cloud setup (see https://atlas.hashicorp.com/centos/boxes/atomic-host). For example, getting the VirtualBox instance up would involve running the following two commands on a machine with vagrant installed:

$ vagrant init centos/atomic-host && vagrant up --provider virtualbox 

ISO

The installer ISO can be used via regular install methods (PXE, CD, USB image, etc.) and uses the Anaconda installer to deliver the CentOS Atomic Host. This image allows users to control the install using kickstarts and to define custom storage, networking and user accounts. This is the recommended option for getting CentOS Atomic Host onto bare metal machines, or for generating your own image sets for custom environments.

QCOW2

The CentOS-Atomic-Host-7-GenericCloud.qcow2 image is suitable for use in on-premise and local virtualized environments. We test this on OpenStack, AWS and local Libvirt installs. If your virtualization platform does not provide its own cloud-init metadata source, you can create your own NoCloud iso image.

Amazon Machine Images

Region Image ID
us-east-1 ami-90e7c686
ap-south-1 ami-2ba1de44
eu-west-2 ami-2b44524f
eu-west-1 ami-a6c5dbc0
ap-northeast-2 ami-87ba65e9
ap-northeast-1 ami-64868e03
sa-east-1 ami-f9197295
ca-central-1 ami-66e55a02
ap-southeast-1 ami-850a88e6
ap-southeast-2 ami-caf7e6a9
eu-central-1 ami-42e84f2d
us-east-2 ami-89bb9dec
us-west-1 ami-245b7644
us-west-2 ami-68818a11

SHA Sums

46082267562f9eefbc4b29058696108f07cb0ceb2dafe601ec5d66bb1037120a  CentOS-Atomic-Host-7.1705-GenericCloud.qcow2
1bd6dfbe360be599a45734f03b34e08cc903630327e1c54534eb4218bf18d0da  CentOS-Atomic-Host-7.1705-GenericCloud.qcow2.gz
aa4a3ac057d3ea898bea07052aa9fd20c7ca7ea3c8a5474bca9227622915e5e2  CentOS-Atomic-Host-7.1705-GenericCloud.qcow2.xz
d99c2e9d1d31907ace3c1e54fc3087ebb9d627ca46168f7e65b469789cd39739  CentOS-Atomic-Host-7.1705-Installer.iso
cfd6a29e26e202476b6a2dc54b1b31321688270a6cc6a9ef4206ac0ebd0e309c  CentOS-Atomic-Host-7.1705-Vagrant-Libvirt.box
d9b5f965f637a909efa15cd43063729db002c012c81a8cde0de588ea0932f970  CentOS-Atomic-Host-7.1705-Vagrant-VirtualBox.box

Release Cycle

The CentOS Atomic Host image follows the upstream Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host cadence. After sources are released, they're rebuilt and included in new images. After the images are tested by the SIG and deemed ready, we announce them.

Getting Involved

CentOS Atomic Host is produced by the CentOS Atomic SIG, based on upstream work from Project Atomic. If you'd like to work on testing images, help with packaging, documentation -- join us!

The SIG meets weekly on Thursdays at 16:00 UTC in the #centos-devel channel, and you'll often find us in #atomic and/or #centos-devel if you have questions. You can also join the atomic-devel mailing list if you'd like to discuss the direction of Project Atomic, its components, or have other questions.

Getting Help

If you run into any problems with the images or components, feel free to ask on the centos-devel mailing list.

Have questions about using Atomic? See the atomic mailing list or find us in the #atomic channel on Freenode.

 

Starting with v1705, we are starting to offer the official CentOS images for Vagrant, for the Hyper-V provider. Hyper-V is Microsoft's native hypervisor, available by default in Windows Server 2008 and newer, Windows 8 Pro, Windows 10 Pro, and Windows Hyper-V Server 2012; since it also powers Microsoft Azure, it's probably a good alternative to VirtualBox for people using Vagrant professionally on Windows hosts. We now support Hyper-V, libvirt (KVM), VirtualBox and VMware as Vagrant providers.

The build scripts are in the vagrant directory of our GitHub repo, https://github.com/CentOS/sig-cloud-instance-build. Pull requests are welcome; please only file a new issue to report actual bugs, not support requests (please use the mailing lists or IRC for that).

Just like with other proprietary hypervisors like VMware, we have no possibility to automatically test the images for Hyper-V on our Continuous Integration infrastructure. We welcome any feedback from Hyper-V users -- please let us know if you think you would be able test our monthly releases on a regular basis (we normally release at the beginning of each month). You can contact us on the centos-devel mailing list or via IRC in #centos-devel on Freenode.

We have been working on providing images for Hyper-V at least since October 2016. It took much longer than I anticipated, due to the necessity of upgrading our build infrastructure and fix several problems with the image configuration. In this context, I would like to warmly thank the following people:

  • Patrick Lang from Microsoft, for helping with testing and debugging the experimental Hyper-V images;
  • Fabian Arrotin and Thomas Oulevey from the CentOS Project, for their infrastructure work;
  • Micheal Vermaes, for helping test the experimental images;
  • Karanbir Singh, the CentOS Project lead, for his constant support and assistence.

2017-06-21: We have released version 1705.02 of the official CentOS Linux images for Vagrant, providing important security fixes in glibc and the Linux kernel, addressing the "stack clash" vulnerability. We advise all users to update to this new release. Existing boxes don't need to be destroyed and recreated: running sudo yum update inside the box will upgrade the packages as needed (a reboot of the box is required after the update).

We are pleased to announce new official Vagrant images of CentOS Linux 6.9 and CentOS Linux 7.3.1611 for x86_64, featuring updated packages to 1 June 2017. Starting with this release, we also provide official images for Hyper-V. Hyper-V is Microsoft's native hypervisor, included by default

Known Issues

  1. The VirtualBox Guest Additions are not preinstalled; if you need them for shared folders, please install the vagrant-vbguest plugin and add the following line to your Vagrantfile:
    config.vm.synced_folder ".", "/vagrant", type: "virtualbox"

    We recommend using NFS instead of VirtualBox shared folders if possible; you can also use the vagrant-sshfs plugin, which, unlike NFS, works on all operating systems.

  2. Since the Guest Additions are missing, our images are preconfigured to use rsync for synced folders. Windows users can either use SMB for synced folders, or disable the sync directory by adding the line
    config.vm.synced_folder ".", "/vagrant", disabled: true

    to their Vagrantfile, to prevent errors on "vagrant up".

  3. Vagrant 1.8.5 is unable to create new CentOS Linux boxes due to Vagrant bug #7610
  4. Vagrant 1.8.7 is unable to download or update boxes due to Vagrant bug #7969.
  5. Vagrant 1.9.1 broke private networking, see Vagrant bug #8166
  6. Vagrant 1.9.3 doesn't work with SMB sync due to Vagrant bug #8404
  7. The vagrant-libvirt plugin is only compatible with Vagrant 1.5 to 1.8
  8. Installing open-vm-tools is not enough for enabling shared folders with Vagrant’s VMware provider. Please follow the detailed instructions in https://github.com/mvermaes/centos-vmware-tools (updated for this release).

Recommended Setup on the Host

Our automatic testing is running on a CentOS Linux 7 host, using Vagrant 1.9.3 with vagrant-libvirt and VirtualBox 5.1.20 (without the Guest Additions) as providers. We strongly recommend using the libvirt provider when stability is required.

We also performed additional manual testing with Vagrant 1.9.4 on OS X 10.11.6, with VirtualBox 5.1.20.

Downloads

The official images can be downloaded from Hashicorp’s Atlas. We provide images for libvirt-kvm, VirtualBox and VMware.

If you never used our images before:

vagrant box add centos/6 # for CentOS Linux 6, or...
vagrant box add centos/7 # for CentOS Linux 7

Existing users can upgrade their images:

vagrant box update --box centos/6
vagrant box update --box centos/7

Verifying the integrity of the images

The SHA256 checksums of the images are signed with the CentOS 7 Official Signing Key. First, download and verify the checksum file:

$ curl http://cloud.centos.org/centos/7/vagrant/x86_64/images/sha256sum.txt.asc -o sha256sum.txt.asc
$ gpg --verify sha256sum.txt.asc

If the check passed, you can use the corresponding checksum when downloading the image with Vagrant:

$ vagrant box add --checksum-type sha256 --checksum aabcfe77a08b72bacbd6f05e5f26b67983b29314ee0039d0db4c9b28b4909fcd --provider libvirt --box-version 1705.01 centos/7

Unfortunately, this is not possible with vagrant box update.

Feedback

If you encounter any unexpected issues with the Vagrant images, feel free to ask on the centos-devel mailing list, or via IRC, in #centos on Freenode.

Ackowledgements

We would like to warmly thank Fabian Arrotin and Thomas Oulevey for their work on the build infrastructure, as well as Patrick Lang from Microsoft for testing and feedback on the Hyper-V images.

We would also like to thank the following people (listed alphabetically):

  • Graham Mainwaring, for helping with tests and validations
  • Michael Vermaes, for testing our official images, as well as for writing the detailed guide to using them with VMware Fusion Pro and VMware Workstation Pro.

An updated version of CentOS Atomic Host (tree version 7.20170428), is now available, featuring the option of substituting the host’s default docker 1.12 container engine with a more recent, docker 1.13-based version, provided via the docker-latest package.

CentOS Atomic Host is a lean operating system designed to run Docker containers, built from standard CentOS 7 RPMs, and tracking the component versions included in Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host.

CentOS Atomic Host is available as a VirtualBox or libvirt-formatted Vagrant box, or as an installable ISO, qcow2 or Amazon Machine image. These images are available for download at cloud.centos.org. The backing ostree repo is published to mirror.centos.org.

CentOS Atomic Host includes these core component versions:

  • atomic-1.15.4-2.el7.x86_64
  • cloud-init-0.7.5-10.el7.centos.1.x86_64
  • docker-1.12.6-16.el7.centos.x86_64
  • etcd-3.1.3-1.el7.x86_64
  • flannel-0.7.0-1.el7.x86_64
  • kernel-3.10.0-514.16.1.el7.x86_64
  • kubernetes-node-1.5.2-0.5.gita552679.el7.x86_64
  • ostree-2017.3-2.el7.x86_64
  • rpm-ostree-client-2017.3-1.atomic.el7.x86_64

Containerized kubernetes-master

The downstream release of CentOS Atomic Host ships without the kubernetes-master package built into the image. Instead, you can run the master kubernetes components (apiserver, scheduler, and controller-manager) in containers, managed via systemd, using the service files and instructions on the CentOS wiki. The containers referenced in these systemd service files are built in and hosted from the CentOS Community Container Pipeline, based on Dockerfiles from the CentOS-Dockerfiles repository.

These containers have been tested with the kubernetes ansible scripts provided in the upstream contrib repository, and they work as expected, provided you first copy the service files onto your master.

Alternatively, you can install the kubernetes-master components using rpm-ostree package layering using the command: atomic host install kubernetes-master.

docker-latest

You can switch to the alternate docker version by running:

# systemctl disable docker --now
# systemctl enable docker-latest --now
# sed -i '/DOCKERBINARY/s/^#//g' /etc/sysconfig/docker

Because both docker services share the /run/docker directory, you cannot run both docker and docker-latest at the same time on the same system.

Upgrading

If you're running a previous version of CentOS Atomic Host, you can upgrade to the current image by running the following command:

$ sudo atomic host upgrade

Images

Vagrant

CentOS-Atomic-Host-7-Vagrant-Libvirt.box and CentOS-Atomic-Host-7-Vagrant-Virtualbox.box are Vagrant boxes for Libvirt and Virtualbox providers.

The easiest way to consume these images is via the Atlas / Vagrant Cloud setup (see https://atlas.hashicorp.com/centos/boxes/atomic-host). For example, getting the VirtualBox instance up would involve running the following two commands on a machine with vagrant installed:

$ vagrant init centos/atomic-host && vagrant up --provider virtualbox 

ISO

The installer ISO can be used via regular install methods (PXE, CD, USB image, etc.) and uses the Anaconda installer to deliver the CentOS Atomic Host. This image allows users to control the install using kickstarts and to define custom storage, networking and user accounts. This is the recommended option for getting CentOS Atomic Host onto bare metal machines, or for generating your own image sets for custom environments.

QCOW2

The CentOS-Atomic-Host-7-GenericCloud.qcow2 image is suitable for use in on-premise and local virtualized environments. We test this on OpenStack, AWS and local Libvirt installs. If your virtualization platform does not provide its own cloud-init metadata source, you can create your own NoCloud iso image.

Amazon Machine Images

Region Image ID
ap-south-1 ami-9c7b06f3
eu-west-2 ami-14425570
eu-west-1 ami-a1b9b7c7
ap-northeast-2 ami-e01cc18e
ap-northeast-1 ami-2a0d304d
sa-east-1 ami-ce7619a2
ca-central-1 ami-8b813def
ap-southeast-1 ami-61e36702
ap-southeast-2 ami-84c7cde7
eu-central-1 ami-f970ae96
us-east-1 ami-4a70015c
us-east-2 ami-d2cfe8b7
us-west-1 ami-57ba9c37
us-west-2 ami-fbd8bd9b

SHA Sums

977c9b6e70dd0170fc092520f01be26c4d256ffe5340928d79c762850e5cedd9  CentOS-Atomic-Host-7.1704-GenericCloud.qcow2
781074c43aa6a6f3cad61a77108541976776eb3cb6fe30f54ca746a8314b5f87  CentOS-Atomic-Host-7.1704-GenericCloud.qcow2.gz
aef7fedf01b920ee75449467eb93724405cb22d861311fbc42406a7bd4dbfee2  CentOS-Atomic-Host-7.1704-GenericCloud.qcow2.xz
669c5fd1b97bc2849a7e3dbec325207d98e834ce71e17e0921b583820d91f4f5  CentOS-Atomic-Host-7.1704-Installer.iso
b5ef69bff65ab595992649f62c8fc67c61faa59ba7f4ff0cb455a9196e450ae2  CentOS-Atomic-Host-7.1704-Vagrant-Libvirt.box
73757f50ef9cdac2e3ba6d88a216cca23000a32fa96891902feaa86d49147e3f  CentOS-Atomic-Host-7.1704-Vagrant-VirtualBox.box

Release Cycle

The CentOS Atomic Host image follows the upstream Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host cadence. After sources are released, they're rebuilt and included in new images. After the images are tested by the SIG and deemed ready, we announce them.

Getting Involved

CentOS Atomic Host is produced by the CentOS Atomic SIG, based on upstream work from Project Atomic. If you'd like to work on testing images, help with packaging, documentation -- join us!

The SIG meets weekly on Thursdays at 16:00 UTC in the #centos-devel channel, and you'll often find us in #atomic and/or #centos-devel if you have questions. You can also join the atomic-devel mailing list if you'd like to discuss the direction of Project Atomic, its components, or have other questions.

Getting Help

If you run into any problems with the images or components, feel free to ask on the centos-devel mailing list.

Have questions about using Atomic? See the atomic mailing list or find us in the #atomic channel on Freenode.

We are pleased to announce new official Vagrant images of CentOS Linux 6.9 and CentOS Linux 7.3.1611 for x86_64, featuring updated packages to 30 April 2017 and the following changes:

  • kdump has been removed from the images, since it needs to reserve 160MB + 2bits/4kB RAM for the crash kernel, and automatic allocation only works on systems with at least 2GB RAM

Known Issues

  1. The VirtualBox Guest Additions are not preinstalled; if you need them for shared folders, please install the vagrant-vbguest plugin and add the following line to your Vagrantfile:
    config.vm.synced_folder ".", "/vagrant", type: "virtualbox"

    . Please note that there is a bug in VirtualBox 5.1.20 that prevents vagrant-vbguest from working.
    We recommend using NFS instead of VirtualBox shared folders if possible. You can also use the vagrant-sshfs plugin, which, unlike NFS, works on all operating systems.

  2. Since the Guest Additions are missing, our images are preconfigured to use rsync for synced folders. Windows users can either use SMB for synced folders, or disable the sync directory by adding the line
    config.vm.synced_folder ".", "/vagrant", disabled: true

    to their Vagrantfile, to prevent errors on "vagrant up".

  3. Vagrant 1.8.5 is unable to create new CentOS Linux boxes due to Vagrant bug #7610
  4. Vagrant 1.8.7 is unable to download or update boxes due to Vagrant bug #7969.
  5. Vagrant 1.9.1 broke private networking, see Vagrant bug #8166
  6. Vagrant 1.9.3 doesn't work with SMB sync due to Vagrant bug #8404
  7. The vagrant-libvirt plugin is only compatible with Vagrant 1.5 to 1.8
  8. Installing open-vm-tools is not enough for enabling shared folders with Vagrant’s VMware provider. Please follow the detailed instructions in https://github.com/mvermaes/centos-vmware-tools (updated for this release).

Recommended Setup on the Host

Our automatic testing is running on a CentOS Linux 7 host, using Vagrant 1.9.3 with vagrant-libvirt and VirtualBox 5.1.20 (without the Guest Additions) as providers. We strongly recommend using the libvirt provider when stability is required.

We also performed additional manual testing with Vagrant 1.9.4 on OS X 10.11.6, with VirtualBox 5.1.20.

Downloads

The official images can be downloaded from Hashicorp’s Atlas. We provide images for libvirt-kvm, VirtualBox and VMware.

If you never used our images before:

vagrant box add centos/6 # for CentOS Linux 6, or...
vagrant box add centos/7 # for CentOS Linux 7

Existing users can upgrade their images:

vagrant box update --box centos/6
vagrant box update --box centos/7

Verifying the integrity of the images

The SHA256 checksums of the images are signed with the CentOS 7 Official Signing Key. First, download and verify the checksum file:

$ curl http://cloud.centos.org/centos/7/vagrant/x86_64/images/sha256sum.txt.asc -o sha256sum.txt.asc
$ gpg --verify sha256sum.txt.asc

If the check passed, you can use the corresponding checksum when downloading the image with Vagrant:

$ vagrant box add --checksum-type sha256 --checksum f8cd95ce24fd9f615dd38bbf8b6c285a916a4cac1d98ada4ab16d6626468032b --provider libvirt --box-version 1704.01 centos/7

Unfortunately, this is not possible with vagrant box update.

Feedback

If you encounter any unexpected issues with the Vagrant images, feel free to ask on the centos-devel mailing list, or via IRC, in #centos on Freenode.

Ackowledgements

We would like to thank Fabian Arrotin and Thomas Oulevey for their work on the build infrastructure.

We would also like to thank the following people (listed alphabetically):

  • Graham Mainwaring, for helping with tests and validations
  • Michael Vermaes, for testing our official images, as well as for writing the detailed guide to using them with VMware Fusion Pro and VMware Workstation Pro.

An updated version of CentOS Atomic Host (tree version 7.20170405), is now available, including significant updates to kubernetes (version 1.5.2), etcd (version 3.1) and flannel (version 0.7).

CentOS Atomic Host is a lean operating system designed to run Docker containers, built from standard CentOS 7 RPMs, and tracking the component versions included in Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host.

CentOS Atomic Host is available as a VirtualBox or libvirt-formatted Vagrant box, or as an installable ISO, qcow2 or Amazon Machine image. These images are available for download at cloud.centos.org. The backing ostree repo is published to mirror.centos.org.

CentOS Atomic Host includes these core component versions:

  • atomic-1.15.4-2.el7.x86_64
  • cloud-init-0.7.5-10.el7.centos.1.x86_64
  • docker-1.12.6-11.el7.centos.x86_64
  • etcd-3.1.0-2.el7.x86_64
  • flannel-0.7.0-1.el7.x86_64
  • kernel-3.10.0-514.10.2.el7.x86_64
  • kubernetes-node-1.5.2-0.2.gitc55cf2b.el7.x86_64
  • ostree-2017.1-3.atomic.el7.x86_64
  • rpm-ostree-client-2017.1-6.atomic.el7.x86_64

Containerized kubernetes-master

The downstream release of CentOS Atomic Host ships without the kubernetes-master package built into the image. Instead, you can run the master kubernetes components (apiserver, scheduler, and controller-manager) in containers, managed via systemd, using the service files and instructions on the CentOS wiki. The containers referenced in these systemd service files are built in and hosted from the CentOS Community Container Pipeline, based on Dockerfiles from the CentOS-Dockerfiles repository.

These containers have been tested with the kubernetes ansible scripts provided in the upstream contrib repository, and they work as expected, provided you first copy the service files onto your master.

Upgrading

If you're running a previous version of CentOS Atomic Host, you can upgrade to the current image by running the following command:

$ sudo atomic host upgrade

Images

Vagrant

CentOS-Atomic-Host-7-Vagrant-Libvirt.box and CentOS-Atomic-Host-7-Vagrant-Virtualbox.box are Vagrant boxes for Libvirt and Virtualbox providers.

The easiest way to consume these images is via the Atlas / Vagrant Cloud setup (see https://atlas.hashicorp.com/centos/boxes/atomic-host). For example, getting the VirtualBox instance up would involve running the following two commands on a machine with vagrant installed:

$ vagrant init centos/atomic-host && vagrant up --provider virtualbox 

ISO

The installer ISO can be used via regular install methods (PXE, CD, USB image, etc.) and uses the Anaconda installer to deliver the CentOS Atomic Host. This image allows users to control the install using kickstarts and to define custom storage, networking and user accounts. This is the recommended option for getting CentOS Atomic Host onto bare metal machines, or for generating your own image sets for custom environments.

QCOW2

The CentOS-Atomic-Host-7-GenericCloud.qcow2 image is suitable for use in on-premise and local virtualized environments. We test this on OpenStack, AWS and local Libvirt installs. If your virtualization platform does not provide its own cloud-init metadata source, you can create your own NoCloud iso image.

Amazon Machine Images

Region Image ID
us-east-1 ami-a50d85b3
ap-south-1 ami-13f6857c
eu-west-2 ami-42233726
eu-west-1 ami-49063c2f
ap-northeast-2 ami-d1c81abf
ap-northeast-1 ami-7b1c3e1c
sa-east-1 ami-914f2dfd
ca-central-1 ami-2de75b49
ap-southeast-1 ami-53328c30
ap-southeast-2 ami-6d929c0e
eu-central-1 ami-dca270b3
us-east-2 ami-18bc987d
us-west-1 ami-b22a0fd2
us-west-2 ami-2e2bbb4e

SHA Sums

b337bc56a71b6b25237a5c0c06c9f48a33973b4e41c648288bcfaf5a494af98c  CentOS-Atomic-Host-7.1703-GenericCloud.qcow2
707db9907a850816fca7782da1dca3584fa0d8be821d0ee95525b688aaa0cc6d  CentOS-Atomic-Host-7.1703-GenericCloud.qcow2.gz
c4ef91cc801777e214106522f848f8b388fb92699d67ed4fe86cc942a361f7a2  CentOS-Atomic-Host-7.1703-GenericCloud.qcow2.xz
5e41a0306a8c1c212117c68eae10f0f59b25cb6c57dec9629bf3ac760bca54bc  CentOS-Atomic-Host-7.1703-Installer.iso
f509eb482a614d2eb047009aaa6c37c125b66cdd483e7015983cae5f72d9f041  CentOS-Atomic-Host-7.1703-Vagrant-Libvirt.box
2c0ba7dda2f4f249aa6c31cfcb36df1a17913b9d8786afb7b340a24b15b404f1  CentOS-Atomic-Host-7.1703-Vagrant-VirtualBox.box

Release Cycle

The CentOS Atomic Host image follows the upstream Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host cadence. After sources are released, they're rebuilt and included in new images. After the images are tested by the SIG and deemed ready, we announce them.

Getting Involved

CentOS Atomic Host is produced by the CentOS Atomic SIG, based on upstream work from Project Atomic. If you'd like to work on testing images, help with packaging, documentation -- join us!

The SIG meets weekly on Thursdays at 16:00 UTC in the #centos-devel channel, and you'll often find us in #atomic and/or #centos-devel if you have questions. You can also join the atomic-devel mailing list if you'd like to discuss the direction of Project Atomic, its components, or have other questions.

Getting Help

If you run into any problems with the images or components, feel free to ask on the centos-devel mailing list.

Have questions about using Atomic? See the atomic mailing list or find us in the #atomic channel on Freenode.

We are pleased to announce new official Vagrant images of CentOS Linux 6.8 and CentOS Linux 7.3.1611 for x86_64, featuring updated packages to 30 March 2017 and the following changes:

  • The VMware images now use the paravirtualized SCSI controller (the kernel module for the LSILogic controller has been deprecated upstream).
  • The VMware images now specify vmware_desktop, allowing them to work with both VMware Fusion and VMware Workstation

Known Issues

  1. The VirtualBox Guest Additions are not preinstalled; if you need them for shared folders, please install the vagrant-vbguest plugin and add the following line to your Vagrantfile:
    config.vm.synced_folder ".", "/vagrant", type: "virtualbox"

    We recommend using NFS instead of VirtualBox shared folders if possible. You can also use the vagrant-sshfs plugin, which, unlike NFS, works on all operating systems.

  2. Since the Guest Additions are missing, our images are preconfigured to use rsync for synced folders. Windows users can either use SMB for synced folders, or disable the sync directory by adding the line
    config.vm.synced_folder ".", "/vagrant", disabled: true

    to their Vagrantfile.

  3. Vagrant 1.8.5 is unable to create new CentOS Linux boxes due to Vagrant bug #7610
  4. Vagrant 1.8.7 is unable to download or update boxes due to Vagrant bug #7969.
  5. Vagrant 1.9.1 broke private networking, see Vagrant bug #8166
  6. Vagrant 1.9.3 doesn't work with SMB sync due to Vagrant bug #8404
  7. Installing open-vm-tools is not enough for enabling shared folders with Vagrant’s VMware provider. Please follow the detailed instructions in https://github.com/mvermaes/centos-vmware-tools (updated for this release).

Recommended Setup on the Host

Our automatic testing is running on a CentOS Linux 7 host, using Vagrant 1.8.1 from SCL, with libvirt and VirtualBox 5.0.30 (without the VirtualBox Guest Additions) as providers. We strongly recommend using the libvirt provider when stability is required.

We also performed additional manual testing with Vagrant 1.9.3 on OS X 10.11.6, with VirtualBox 5.1.18.

Downloads

The official images can be downloaded from Hashicorp’s Atlas. We provide images for libvirt-kvm, VirtualBox and VMware.

If you never used our images before:

$ vagrant box add centos/6 # for CentOS Linux 6
$ vagrant box add centos/7 # for CentOS Linux 7

Existing users can upgrade their images:

$ vagrant box update --box centos/6
$ vagrant box update --box centos/7

Verifying the integrity of the images

The SHA256 checksums of the images are signed with the CentOS 7 Official Signing Key. First, download and verify the checksum file:

$ curl http://cloud.centos.org/centos/7/vagrant/x86_64/images/sha256sum.txt.asc -o sha256sum.txt.asc
$ gpg --verify sha256sum.txt.asc

If the check passed, you can use the corresponding checksum when downloading the image with Vagrant:

$ vagrant box add --checksum-type sha256 --checksum 82bbed14c34fdd8fd3cb617b0e8c0f154ebd4d1388f45de3335b2cdf791e5fed --provider libvirt --box-version 1703.01 centos/7

Unfortunately, this is not possible with vagrant box update.

Feedback

If you encounter any unexpected issues with the Vagrant images, feel free to ask on the centos-devel mailing list, or via IRC, in #centos on Freenode.

Ackowledgements

We would like to thank Fabian Arrotin and Thomas Oulevey for their work on the build infrastructure.

We would also like to thank the following people (listed alphabetically):

  • Graham Mainwaring, for helping with tests and validations
  • Michael Vermaes, for testing our official images, as well as for writing the detailed guide to using them with VMware Fusion Pro and VMware Workstation Pro.

We are pleased to announce new official Vagrant images of CentOS Linux 6.8 and CentOS Linux 7.3.1611 for x86_64, featuring updated packages to 28 February 2017.

Known Issues

  1. The VirtualBox Guest Additions are not preinstalled; if you need them for shared folders, please install the vagrant-vbguest plugin and add the following line to your Vagrantfile:
    config.vm.synced_folder ".", "/vagrant", type: "virtualbox"

    We recommend using NFS instead of VirtualBox shared folders if possible. You can also use the vagrant-sshfs plugin, which, unlike NFS, works on all operating systems.

  2. Since the Guest Additions are missing, our images are preconfigured to use rsync for synced folders. Windows users can either use SMB for synced folders, or disable the sync directory by adding the line
    config.vm.synced_folder ".", "/vagrant", disabled: true

    to their Vagrantfile.

  3. Vagrant 1.8.5 is unable to create new Linux boxes due to Vagrant bug #7610
  4. Vagrant 1.8.7 is unable to download or update boxes due to Vagrant bug #7969.
  5. Vagrant 1.9.1 broke private networking, see Vagrant bug #8166
  6. Installing open-vm-tools is not enough for enabling shared folders with Vagrant’s VMware provider. Please follow the detailed instructions in https://github.com/mvermaes/centos-vmware-tools (updated for this release).
  7. The metadata of the images for VMware is set to vmware_fusion. Please specify vmware_fusion as the provider when downloading the images, even if you're using VMware Workstation.

Recommended Setup on the Host

Our automatic testing is running on a CentOS Linux 7 host, using Vagrant from SCL, with libvirt and VirtualBox 5.0.30 (without the VirtualBox Guest Additions) as providers. We strongly recommend using the libvirt provider when stability is required.

We also performed additional manual testing with Vagrant 1.9.0 on OS X 10.11.6, with VirtualBox 5.0.30.

Downloads

The official images can be downloaded from Hashicorp’s Atlas. We provide images for libvirt-kvm, VirtualBox and VMware.

If you never used our images before:

$ vagrant box add centos/6 # for CentOS Linux 6
$ vagrant box add centos/7 # for CentOS Linux 7

Existing users can upgrade their images:

$ vagrant box update --box centos/6
$ vagrant box update --box centos/7

Verifying the integrity of the images

The SHA256 checksums of the images are signed with the CentOS 7 Official Signing Key. First, download and verify the checksum file:

$ curl http://cloud.centos.org/centos/7/vagrant/x86_64/images/sha256sum.txt.asc -o sha256sum.txt.asc
$ gpg --verify sha256sum.txt.asc

If the check passed, you can use the corresponding checksum when downloading the image with Vagrant:

$ vagrant box add --checksum-type sha256 --checksum 48745c0f2dd4fbee366d830e3e333b637528ad936dd66ed5911df2adc02f46d7 --provider libvirt --box-version 1702.01 centos/7

Unfortunately, this is not possible with vagrant box update.

Feedback

If you encounter any unexpected issues with the Vagrant images, feel free to ask on the centos-devel mailing list, or via IRC, in #centos on Freenode.

Ackowledgements

We would like to thank Fabian Arrotin and Thomas Oulevey for their work on the build infrastructure.

We would also like to thank the following people (listed alphabetically):

  • Graham Mainwaring, for helping with tests and validations
  • Michael Vermaes, for testing our official images, as well as for writing the detailed guide to using them with VMware Fusion Pro and VMware Workstation Pro.

As announced, and confirmed on the centos-devel list, next week we'll have a major outage impacting several services that are hosted in the same DC : due to some reorganization at the DC/Cage level, we'll have to shutdown/move/reconfigure a big part of our hosted infra for the following services :

  • https://cbs.centos.org (Koji)
  • https://accounts.centos.org (auth backend, and also https://id.centos.org, our idp in front of ACO)
  • https://ci.centos.org (jenkins-driven CI environment)
  • https://registry.centos.org (that one will be temporary migrated to a read-only registry, so that people already pointing to that node will continue to be able to pull images)

We're working on a plan to minimize the downtime/reconfiguration part, but at first sight, due to the hardware move of the racks/recabling parts/etc, the announced downtime will be probably ~48h.

What does that mean ? That during this maintenance window, nobody will be able to build/tests packages, nor be able to triggers automatically CI jobs (important). This hardware migration is scheduled for March 14th, starting at 13:00 UTC.

We'll obviously try to restore those services as soon as possible, to minimize the impact on people building pkgs for SIGs

If you have questions, feel free to discuss this in the #centos-devel channel on irc.freenode.net, or the centos-devel mailing list