Official Vagrant images for CentOS Linux 6 and CentOS Linux 7 for x86_64 are now available for download, featuring updated packages to 1st July 2016 and some improvements:

  • the default timezone is set to UTC (instead of New York, USA)
  • NTP is enabled by default (using ntpd on CentOS Linux 6 and chrony on CentOS Linux 7)
  • yum-utils is installed by default on CentOS Linux 7, providing needs-restarting

Known Issues

  • The Vagrant sync folder is /home/vagrant/sync instead of /vagrant (which is the Vagrant default). This will be changed in the next release.
  • The root password is set to a random string, instead of “vagrant”. Use sudo as the vagrant user to gain administrative privileges, no password is required.
  • The VirtualBox Guest Additions are not preinstalled, and there are currently no plans of adding them. They are only needed for shared folders; host-only networking and forwarded ports work, although Vagrant displays a warning to the contrary. If you use Ansible, take a look at https://github.com/lpancescu/cloud-instance-starter-kit for an example of automatic installation. The vagrant-vbguest plugin might also work (not tested).

Downloads

Only x86_64 images are currently available, for Vagrant’s libvirt and VirtualBox providers.

First-time users can download the official images from Hashicorp’s Atlas. You can use vagrant box add centos/6 for CentOS Linux 6, or vagrant box add centos/7 for CentOS Linux 7.

Existing users can upgrade their boxes directly by Vagrant, e.g. vagrant box update --box centos/7, but the changes will only apply to newly created instances.

Feedback

If you encounter any unexpected issues with the Vagrant images, feel free to ask on the centos-devel mailing list, or in #centos-devel on Freenode.

An updated version of CentOS Atomic Host (tree version 7.20160707) is now available for download, featuring updated versions of docker (1.10.3) and the atomic run tool (1.10.5). CentOS Atomic Host is a lean operating system designed to run Docker containers, built from standard CentOS 7 RPMs, and tracking the component versions included in Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host.

CentOS Atomic Host is available as a VirtualBox or libvirt-formatted Vagrant box, or as an installable ISO, qcow2 or Amazon Machine image. These images are available for download at cloud.centos.org. The backing ostree repo is published to mirror.centos.org.

CentOS Atomic Host includes these core component versions:

  • docker-1.10.3-44.el7.centos.x86_64
  • kubernetes-1.2.0-0.12.gita4463d9.el7.x86_64
  • kernel-3.10.0-327.22.2.el7.x86_64
  • atomic-1.10.5-5.el7.x86_64
  • flannel-0.5.3-9.el7.x86_64
  • ostree-2016.5-3.atomic.el7.x86_64
  • etcd-2.2.5-2.el7.0.1.x86_64
  • cloud-init-0.7.5-10.el7.centos.1.x86_64

Upgrading

If you’re running a previous version of CentOS Atomic Host, you can upgrade to the current image by running the following command:

$ sudo atomic host upgrade

Images

Vagrant

CentOS-Atomic-Host-7-Vagrant-Libvirt.box (467 MB) and CentOS-Atomic-Host-7-Vagrant-Virtualbox.box (477 MB) are Vagrant boxes for Libvirt and Virtualbox providers.

The easiest way to consume these images is via the Atlas / Vagrant Cloud setup (see https://atlas.hashicorp.com/centos/boxes/atomic-host). For example, getting the VirtualBox instance up would involve running the following two commands on a machine with vagrant installed:

$ vagrant init centos/atomic-host && vagrant up --provider virtualbox

ISO

The installer ISO (751 MB) can be used via regular install methods (PXE, CD, USB image, etc.) and uses the Anaconda installer to deliver the CentOS Atomic Host. This image allows users to control the install using kickstarts and to define custom storage, networking and user accounts. This is the recommended option for getting CentOS Atomic Host onto bare metal machines, or for generating your own image sets for custom environments.

QCOW2

The CentOS-Atomic-Host-7-GenericCloud.qcow2 (1.1 GB) image is suitable for use in on-premise and local virtualized environments. We test this on OpenStack, AWS and local Libvirt installs. If your virtualization platform does not provide its own cloud-init metadata source, you can create your own NoCloud iso image.

Amazon Machine Images

Region         Image ID 
------         --------
us-east-1      ami-956fe882 
us-west-2      ami-17569677 
us-west-1      ami-191e5879 
eu-west-1      ami-a06601d3 
eu-central-1   ami-c431dbab 
ap-southeast-1 ami-9638e5f5 
ap-northeast-1 ami-fc867b9d 
ap-southeast-2 ami-6fab800c 
ap-northeast-2 ami-aca369c2 
sa-east-1      ami-30f96d5c

SHA Sums

0eb6fe98706c72635d2f156d3f9cbc4447db3234dafd792ed2b966a562695dcf CentOS-Atomic-Host-7.1606-GenericCloud.qcow2 
3af5dba377f31f52817820f8b940d0490da11d74d01edd70182171f21382fc65 CentOS-Atomic-Host-7.1606-GenericCloud.qcow2.gz 
d28b3f21de85c6c072e277bf873d1657364f6b82f08c91b05ed001ceadb07b79 CentOS-Atomic-Host-7.1606-GenericCloud.qcow2.xz 
ee98acb5a50288e03dc052d4ae5cf0ccbab518f2f15f35500217c90d8088d627 CentOS-Atomic-Host-7.1606-Installer.iso 
43ca397be511a32b3c750a73474039f965d6cc5c7dcfb74846e66366f5d758db CentOS-Atomic-Host-7.1606-Vagrant-Libvirt.box 
d458714f89b1ee3d4e4b7b097877cec9ceec5e651fec9374b4457e5a6c172f3d CentOS-Atomic-Host-7.1606-Vagrant-Virtualbox.box

Release Cycle

The CentOS Atomic Host image follows the upstream Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host cadence. After sources are released, they’re rebuilt and included in new images. After the images are tested by the SIG and deemed ready, we announce them.

Getting Involved

CentOS Atomic Host is produced by the CentOS Atomic SIG, based on upstream work from Project Atomic. If you’d like to work on testing images, help with packaging, documentation — join us!

The SIG meets weekly on Thursdays at 16:00 UTC in the #centos-devel channel, and you’ll often find us in #atomic and/or #centos-devel if you have questions. You can also join the atomic-devel mailing list if you’d like to discuss the direction of Project Atomic, its components, or have other questions.

Getting Help

If you run into any problems with the images or components, feel free to ask on the centos-devel mailing list.

Have questions about using Atomic? See the atomic mailing list or find us in the #atomic channel on Freenode.

I’ve been asked a few times about running virtual machines on the ARMv8 AArch64 platform, so it may be time to document the procedure.
There are a few packages you’ll need to make this happen, so lets install them first. The AAVMF package is the one noticeable difference between AArch64 and x86_64. It contains the needed UEFI loaders for the vm to function properly.

[root@aarch64 ~]# yum install NetworkManager libvirt libvirt-daemon virt-install qemu-img-ev qemu-kvm-ev AAVMF

Most users will want a bridged network, so we need to create one. I find it easiest (and safest) to do this with nmcli from the local console, but you’re free to do it however you wish. The commands below will remove the default eth0 interface configuration, create a bridge, and add eth0 to that bridge. Once that’s done, we start up the libvirt daemon and make sure it starts on boot.

[root@aarch64 ~]# nmcli con delete eth0
[root@aarch64 ~]# nmcli con add type bridge ifname br0 stp no
[root@aarch64 ~]# nmcli con add type bridge-slave ifname eth0 master br0
[root@aarch64 ~]# systemctl enable libvirtd
[root@aarch64 ~]# systemctl start libvirtd

Now that we have our bridge enabled and libvirtd is running, we can create our virtual machine. I use the virt-install command below to initialize a vm with 2 gigs of ram, and 10G of disk space via a kickstart install. Example kickstarts for various tasks will be published soon at https://github.com/CentOS/AltArch


virt-install --name centos-7-aarch64 \
--initrd-inject kickstart.ks \
--extra-args "ks=file:/kickstart.ks" \
--disk=pool=default,size=10,format=qcow2,bus=virtio \
--memory 2048 \
--location 'http://mirror.centos.org/altarch/7/os/aarch64/'

Once the installation is complete, the system will reboot and the vm will be ready to use. A quick virsh list will show that the guest vm is active, and a virsh console will give you console access to the vm, just as you’d expect on an x86_64 system.


[root@aarch64 ~]# virsh list
Id Name State
----------------------------------------------------
3 centos-7-aarch64 running

[root@aarch64 ~]# virsh console centos-7-aarch64
CentOS Linux 7 (AltArch)
Kernel 4.2.0-0.29.el7.1.aarch64 on an aarch64

localhost login:

Finally, once we’re done playing around with the image, there’s a slight bit of extra work required to remove it. Because the aarch64 images have an nvram specification we need to be sure to pass that information on to virsh, otherwise the undefine command will fail with an nvram error. The command example below shows how to delete the vm, including the disk image.


[root@aarch64 ~]# virsh undefine centos-7-aarch64 --remove-all-storage --nvram
Domain centos-7-aarch64 has been undefined
Volume 'vda'(/var/lib/libvirt/images/centos-7-aarch64.qcow2) removed.

 

That’s all there is to it. From here, you can use virsh or any of the other vm management tooling as you ordinarily would. The dark days of manually specifying AAVMF loader locations are behind us, as libvirt handles it all with ease now.

Testing your software project is important. Effectively communicating your test results to those that consume your project comes in a close second. Recently we enabled the Embeddable Build Status plugin in https://ci.centos.org which provides Pass/Fail images for the latest build of each job in CICO. These badges are perfect for inclusion in upstream webpages, and in Github README files.

To view a list of links and a short explanation of options related to a particular job, visit the ‘Embeddable Build Status’ link in the sidebar of each job page:

ebs_link

Embedding Badges in a Webpage

Since the badges are simply links to images, they can be pasted directly in <img>
tags on a blog or webpage. For the CentOS 7 t_functional nightly runs, a badge on a webpage with a link back to the project page would look something like this:

<a href="https://ci.centos.org/job/CentOS-Core-QA-t_functional-c7-64/"><img src="https://ci.centos.org/buildStatus/icon?job=CentOS-Core-QA-t_functional-c7-64" /></a>

Embedding Badges on Github

Including a badge in a Github README is as simple as using the Markdown link instead of the Plain link. For the same job above:

[![Build Status](https://ci.centos.org/buildStatus/icon?job=CentOS-Core-QA-t_functional-c7-64)](https://ci.centos.org/job/CentOS-Core-QA-t_functional-c7-64/)

To see what this looks like in action, visit the README in the t_functional repository on Github: https://github.com/CentOS/sig-core-t_functional
t_functional_status

To join the public CI effort and report the status of your jobs, say hello: ci [at] centos.org

Official Vagrant images for CentOS Linux 6 and CentOS Linux 7 for x86_64 are now available for download, featuring updated packages to 1st June 2016 and some improvements:

  • The size of the boot partition was increased to 250 MB for CentOS Linux 6 and 500 MB for CentOS Linux 7, as the Red Hat documentation recommends (this should prevent the system becoming impossible to update due to lack of space in /boot)
  • systemd will create a new machine id on first boot, making it possible to address multiple instances, all created from the official Vagrant image, in the same network (only for CentOS 7)
  • on CentOS Linux 6, tuned is preinstalled and it will use the virt-guest profile to improve performance (this was already the case on CentOS 7)
  • yum’s infra variable is set to vag, to offer CentOS developers some insight into how many installations are Vagrant instances

Known issues

  • The Vagrant sync folder is /home/vagrant/sync instead of /vagrant (which is the Vagrant default). The plan is to create link between the two locations in the next release, and only leave /vagrant in place in the release after the next.
  • Instances should always use NTP, but the official images don’t enable any NTP daemon (yet)
  • The VirtualBox Guest Additions are not preinstalled, and there are currently no plans of adding them. They are only needed for shared folders; host-only networking and forwarded ports work, although Vagrant displays a warning to the contrary. If you need the VirtualBox Guest Additions and would like to install them automatically, take a look at https://github.com/lpancescu/cloud-instance-starter-kit (pull requests are welcome).

Downloads

Only x86_64 images are currently available, for Vagrant’s libvirt and VirtualBox providers.

First-time users can download the official images from Hashicorp’s Atlas. You can use vagrant box add centos/6 for CentOS Linux 6, or vagrant box add centos/7 for CentOS Linux 7.

Existing users can upgrade their boxes directly by Vagrant, e.g. vagrant box update --box centos/7, but the changes will only apply to newly created instances.

Feedback

If you have any questions or problems with the Vagrant images, feel free to ask on the centos-devel mailing list, or in #centos-devel on Freenode.

The CentOS Project is heading to Red Hat Summit, but we need your help! Since this event is kind of a big deal, we need to make sure our booth is appropriately dressed for the occasion. The theme for the community space around summit draws it’s inspiration from some popular NASA JPL posters, and we’d like to showcase our community’s creativity by having your designs at our both and possibly by handing them out as giveaways during the conference. We at the Project are better builders and sys-admins than designers. We’d love to see your suggestions and ideas.

 

If you have a design you’d like to see us use for the poster and booth work, you can submit it to the CentOS mailing list, or post it as a pull request to our community artwork repository. The designs need to be submitted by midnight(EST) on Monday, April 25th so that we have time to go through the submissions. Let’s see what sort of creativity is lurking out there!

An updated version of CentOS Atomic Host (version 7.20160404) is now available for download, featuring significant updates to docker (1.9.1) and to the atomic run tool. Version 1.9 of the atomic run tool now includes support for storage backend migration, for downloading and deploying specific atomic tree versions, and for displaying process information from all containers running on a host.

CentOS Atomic Host is a lean operating system designed to run Docker containers, built from standard CentOS 7 RPMs, and tracking the component versions included in Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host.

CentOS Atomic Host is available as a VirtualBox or libvirt-formatted Vagrant box, or as an installable ISO, qcow2 or Amazon Machine image. These images are available for download at cloud.centos.org. The backing ostree repo is published to mirror.centos.org.

CentOS Atomic Host includes these core component versions:

  • docker-1.9.1-25.el7.centos.x86_64
  • kubernetes-1.2.0-0.9.alpha1.gitb57e8bd.el7.x86_64
  • kernel-3.10.0-327.13.1.el7.x86_64
  • atomic-1.9-4.gitff44c6a.el7.x86_64
  • flannel-0.5.3-9.el7.x86_64
  • ostree-2016.1-2.atomic.el7.x86_64
  • etcd-2.2.5-1.el7.x86_64
  • cloud-init-0.7.5-10.el7.centos.1.x86_64

Upgrading

If you’re running a previous version of CentOS Atomic Host, you can upgrade to the current image by running the following command:

$ sudo atomic host upgrade

Images

Vagrant

CentOS-Atomic-Host-7-Vagrant-Libvirt.box (414 MB) and CentOS-Atomic-Host-7-Vagrant-Virtualbox.box (426 MB) are Vagrant boxes for Libvirt and Virtualbox providers.

The easiest way to consume these images is via the Atlas / Vagrant Cloud setup (see https://atlas.hashicorp.com/centos/boxes/atomic-host). For example, getting the VirtualBox instance up would involve running the following two commands on a machine with vagrant installed:

$ vagrant init centos/atomic-host && vagrant up –provider virtualbox

ISO

The installer ISO (731 MB) can be used via regular install methods (PXE, CD, USB image, etc.) and uses the Anaconda installer to deliver the CentOS Atomic Host. This image allows users to control the install using kickstarts and to define custom storage, networking and user accounts. This is the recommended option for getting CentOS Atomic Host onto bare metal machines, or for generating your own image sets for custom environments.

QCOW2

The CentOS-Atomic-Host-7-GenericCloud.qcow2 (1 GB) image is suitable for use in on-premise and local virtualized environments. We test this on OpenStack, AWS and local Libvirt installs. If your virtualization platform does not provide its own cloud-init metadata source, you can create your own NoCloud iso image.

Amazon Machine Images

Region Image ID
us-east-1 ami-22617648
us-west-2 ami-65659005
us-west-1 ami-68710d08
eu-west-1 ami-bb9616c8
eu-central-1 ami-f03fde9f
ap-southeast-1 ami-2da6734e
ap-northeast-1 ami-100f1f7e
ap-southeast-2 ami-b284a7d1
ap-northeast-2 ami-7a1dd414
sa-east-1 ami-0668e76a

 

SHA Sums

10e024927636863fd11e9a9427f9b552b6c67661f695f418b1228dda33bc6ed5 CentOS-Atomic-Host-7.1603-GenericCloud.qcow2 
00a3c556e11094a996f7e688609158aa6909181d34cc767a26a43e41d39a00a2 CentOS-Atomic-Host-7.1603-GenericCloud.qcow2.gz 
1ea638075f41f87751d123cc8cfe8860f6987e009b83d9692161209e2c2ce4af CentOS-Atomic-Host-7.1603-GenericCloud.qcow2.xz 
9f7717da7b6813b1b7a1f87c577c8977915a8c350c36fb64b1f26dcc60bf21eb CentOS-Atomic-Host-7.1603-Installer.iso
f227bcb447f3de1800faf08e453920fd739330cc942ba331467b2099026477f2 CentOS-Atomic-Host-7.1603-Vagrant-Libvirt.box
bc451f55a53e1df83b7556a123a99922ffd867c35eaba2dfc6bfd8aecc748472 CentOS-Atomic-Host-7.1603-Vagrant-Virtualbox.box

Release Cycle

The CentOS Atomic Host image follows the upstream Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host cadence. After sources are released, they’re rebuilt and included in new images. After the images are tested by the SIG and deemed ready, we announce them.

Getting Involved

CentOS Atomic Host is produced by the CentOS Atomic SIG, based on upstream work from Project Atomic. If you’d like to work on testing images, help with packaging, documentation — join us!

The SIG meets weekly on Thursdays at 16:00 UTC in the #centos-devel channel, and you’ll often find us in #atomic and/or #centos-devel if you have questions. You can also join the atomic-devel mailing list if you’d like to discuss the direction of Project Atomic, its components, or have other questions.

Getting Help

If you run into any problems with the images or components, feel free to ask on the centos-devel mailing list.

Have questions about using Atomic? See the atomic mailing list or find us in the #atomic channel on Freenode.

An updated version of CentOS Atomic Host (version 7.20160224) is now available for download. CentOS Atomic Host is a lean operating system designed to run Docker containers, built from standard CentOS 7 RPMs, and tracking the component versions included in Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host.

CentOS Atomic Host is available as a VirtualBox or libvirt-formatted Vagrant box, or as an installable ISO, qcow2 or Amazon Machine image. These images are available for download at cloud.centos.org. The backing ostree repo is published to mirror.centos.org.

CentOS Atomic Host includes these core component versions:

  • kernel-3.10.0-327.10.1.el7.x86_64
  • cloud-init-0.7.5-10.el7.centos.1.x86_64
  • atomic-1.6-6.gitca1e384.el7.x86_64
  • kubernetes-1.2.0-0.6.alpha1.git8632732.el7.x86_64
  • etcd-2.2.2-5.el7.x86_64
  • ostree-2016.1-2.atomic.el7.x86_64
  • docker-1.8.2-10.el7.centos.x86_64
  • flannel-0.5.3-9.el7.x86_64

Upgrading

If you’re running a previous version of CentOS Atomic Host, you can upgrade to the current image by running the following command:

$ sudo atomic host upgrade

Images

Vagrant

CentOS-Atomic-Host-7-Vagrant-Libvirt.box (421 MB) and CentOS-Atomic-Host-7-Vagrant-Virtualbox.box (435 MB) are Vagrant boxes for Libvirt and Virtualbox providers.

The easiest way to consume these images is via the Atlas / Vagrant Cloud setup (see https://atlas.hashicorp.com/centos/boxes/atomic-host). For example, getting the VirtualBox instance up would involve running the following two commands on a machine with vagrant installed:

$ vagrant init centos/atomic-host && vagrant up --provider virtualbox

ISO

The installer ISO (742 MB) can be used via regular install methods (PXE, CD, USB image, etc.) and uses the Anaconda installer to deliver the CentOS Atomic Host. This image allows users to control the install using kickstarts and to define custom storage, networking and user accounts. This is the recommended option for getting CentOS Atomic Host onto bare metal machines, or for generating your own image sets for custom environments.

QCOW2

The CentOS-Atomic-Host-7-GenericCloud.qcow2 (1 GB) image is suitable for use in on-premise and local virtualized environments. We test this on OpenStack, AWS and local Libvirt installs. If your virtualization platform does not provide its own cloud-init metadata source, you can create your own NoCloud iso image.

Amazon Machine Images

Region Image ID
sa-east-1 ami-059d1f69
ap-northeast-1 ami-c74644a9
ap-southeast-2 ami-bae8ced9
us-west-2 ami-3fb05d5f
ap-southeast-1 ami-6c4c850f
eu-central-1 ami-ce8663a1
eu-west-1 ami-451ea236
us-west-1 ami-fd62129d
us-east-1 ami-e6d5e88c
ap-northeast-2 ami-5732fc39

SHA Sums

d4e43826fc9f641272e589dfb8d979cd592809b34cdbdaee8b7abc9a09ff30d2 CentOS-Atomic-Host-7.1602-GenericCloud.qcow2
33bd4f732c2857c698bd00bc6db29ae2a4d7d0b768f0353d4e28a5c5ab1c999e CentOS-Atomic-Host-7.1602-GenericCloud.qcow2.gz
ee9d9b4d78906ea9c33b0b87c8ad3387e997b479626e64ffedfd3f415a84cded CentOS-Atomic-Host-7.1602-GenericCloud.qcow2.xz
39a548f95022a9ab100d64dbf3579d40c66add1bc56ca938b7dba38b73c2ea87 CentOS-Atomic-Host-7.1602-Installer.iso
2f965b2a502c3839b6be84dee5ee4e60328d9f074e1494ded58b418a309df060 CentOS-Atomic-Host-7.1602-Vagrant-Libvirt.box
bc976d197cac629fd68a6d8faf6bcfaeca8afd0020bf573ef343622a7ae1581b CentOS-Atomic-Host-7.1602-Vagrant-Virtualbox.box

Release Cycle

The CentOS Atomic Host image follows the upstream Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host cadence. After sources are released, they’re rebuilt and included in new images. After the images are tested by the SIG and deemed ready, we announce them.

Getting Involved

CentOS Atomic Host is produced by the CentOS Atomic SIG, based on upstream work from Project Atomic. If you’d like to work on testing images, help with packaging, documentation — join us!

The SIG meets weekly on Thursdays at 16:00 UTC in the #centos-devel channel, and you’ll often find us in #atomic and/or #centos-devel if you have questions. You can also join the atomic-devel mailing list if you’d like to discuss the direction of Project Atomic, its components, or have other questions.

Getting Help

If you run into any problems with the images or components, feel free to ask on the centos-devel mailing list.

Have questions about using Atomic? See the atomic mailing list or find us in the #atomic channel on Freenode.

An updated version of CentOS Atomic Host (version 7.20160203) is now available for download. CentOS Atomic Host is a lean operating system designed to run Docker containers, built from standard CentOS 7 RPMs, and tracking the component versions included in Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host 7.2.

CentOS Atomic Host is available as a VirtualBox or libvirt-formatted Vagrant box, or as an installable ISO, qcow2 or Amazon Machine image. These images are available for download at cloud.centos.org. The backing ostree repo is published to mirror.centos.org.

CentOS Atomic Host includes these core component versions:

  • kernel-3.10.0-327.4.5.el7.x86_64
  • cloud-init-0.7.5-10.el7.centos.1.x86_64
  • atomic-1.6-6.gitca1e384.el7.x86_64
  • kubernetes-1.0.3-0.2.gitb9a88a7.el7.x86_64
  • etcd-2.1.1-2.el7.x86_64
  • ostree-2015.9-2.atomic.el7.x86_64
  • docker-1.8.2-10.el7.centos.x86_64
  • flannel-0.5.3-8.el7.x86_64

Upgrading

If you’re running a previous version of CentOS Atomic Host, you can upgrade to the current image by running the following command:

$ sudo atomic host upgrade

Images

Vagrant

CentOS-Atomic-Host-7-Vagrant-Libvirt.box (416 MB) and CentOS-Atomic-Host-7-Vagrant-Virtualbox.box (428 MB) are Vagrant boxes for Libvirt and Virtualbox providers.

The easiest way to consume these images is via the Atlas / Vagrant Cloud setup (see https://atlas.hashicorp.com/centos/boxes/atomic-host). For example, getting the VirtualBox instance up would involve running the following two commands on a machine with vagrant installed:

$ vagrant init centos/atomic-host && vagrant up --provider virtualbox

ISO

The installer ISO (737 MB) can be used via regular install methods (PXE, CD, USB image, etc.) and uses the Anaconda installer to deliver the CentOS Atomic Host. This allows flexibility to control the install using kickstarts and define custom storage, networking and user accounts. This is the recommended process for getting CentOS Atomic Host onto bare metal machines, or to generate your own image sets for custom environments.

QCOW2

The CentOS-Atomic-Host-7-GenericCloud.qcow2 (1 GB) is suitable for use in on-premise and local virtualized environments. We test this on OpenStack, AWS and local Libvirt installs. If your virtualization platform does not provide its own cloud-init metadata source, you can create your own NoCloud iso image. The Generic Cloud image is also available compressed in gz format (418 MB) and xz compressed (318 MB).

Amazon Machine Images

Region Image ID
sa-east-1 ami-238d0e4f
ap-northeast-1 ami-b54d4adb
ap-southeast-2 ami-27123544
us-west-2 ami-1f94747f
ap-southeast-1 ami-4319d720
eu-central-1 ami-40d6cd2c
eu-west-1 ami-430aba30
us-west-1 ami-dae791ba
us-east-1 ami-896653e3
ap-northeast-2 ami-961fd1f8

SHA Sums

4062ef213eed698ac8ec03b32a55dd6903721a44dc8d54a18513644f160ca7d4 CentOS-Atomic-Host-7.20160130-GenericCloud.qcow2
a7dd91736f45101e95e7d9a80c2eede9164eb0392c8c4748b08c98a42d3eda39 CentOS-Atomic-Host-7.20160130-GenericCloud.qcow2.gz
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Release Cycle

The CentOS Atomic Host image follows the upstream Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host cadence. After sources are released, they’re rebuilt and included in new images. After the images are tested by the SIG and deemed ready, we announce them.

Getting Involved

CentOS Atomic Host is produced by the CentOS Atomic SIG, based on upstream work from Project Atomic. If you’d like to work on testing images, help with packaging, documentation — join us!

The SIG meets weekly on Thursdays at 16:00 UTC in the #centos-devel channel, and you’ll often find us in #atomic and/or #centos-devel if you have questions. You can also join the atomic-devel mailing list if you’d like to discuss the direction of Project Atomic, its components, or have other questions.

Getting Help

If you run into any problems with the images or components, feel free to ask on the centos-devel mailing list.

Have questions about using Atomic? See the atomic mailing list or find us in the #atomic channel on Freenode.

With the latest release of CentOS-7, we have added several new Alternative Architecture (AltArch) releases in addition to our standard x86_64 (x86 {Intel/AMD} 64-bit) architecture.

Architectures (aka arches) in Linux distributions refer to the type of CPU on which the distribution runs.  In the case of our standard release, it runs on x86 64-bit CPUs like Intel Pentium 64-bit and AMD 64-bit processors.  A few months ago, in the CentOS 7 (1503) release, we added the x86 32-bit (i686) as well as the Arm 64-bit (aarch64) architectures to CentOS-7.  These two arches have been updated to our latest CentOS-7 release (1511).

We have additionally added 3 new architectures to our latest release.  Arm32 Userland (armhfp), PowerPC 7 (ppc64) and PowerPC 8 LE (ppc64le).  Here is the Release Announcement.

These new architectures provide a long lived community based platform based on our x86_64 releases many new machine types.  The CentOS team is very excited to be able to provide our code base for these architectures and we need help from the community to make them all better.

We are hosting a CentOS Dojo in Brussels, Belgium on the 29th Jan 2016. Lots of the key people working on the AltArch builds will be present there and it would be a great forum to engage with these groups. You can get the details for the event HERE, including the registration links. (Note: Registrations are currently closed, but we are trying to find more space, so they could open before the event)

We will also have a booth at FOSDEM 2016, as well as talks in the Distributions DevRoom, see you there.